Chris Tarrant on his dad, living in the countryside and getting in trouble as a child

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Chris Tarrant takes part in a Global Radio charity event in 2013 ©PA

Chris Tarrant takes part in a Global Radio charity event ©PA

Chris Tarrant’s big break came in 1974 when he was appointed the presenter of children’s TV programme Tiswas.

During the 1980s and 1990s, he fronted a number of shows for Capital FM.

In 1998, Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? aired for the first time. The quiz show was on air for 15 years with Chris acting as its host.

How do you like your tea?

Milk, no sugar and strong 
– I use two tea bags.

Who would you most 
like to have a cup 
of tea with?

Tina Turner. She’s 
the most wonderful, vibrant, brilliant woman. I’ve spent years trying to meet her, but never managed it.

Tell us about your book, Dad’s War…

Dad and 
I were very close, but he’d never talk about the Second World War.

It was only after he died that I found out about his experiences and how many people he’d seen die around 
him, and I was moved to put everything down on paper.

Today’s generation have no concept of how horrific it was.

What do you remember most about your dad?

He was wonderful, but quite mad. He was still running everywhere until he was 85 and hanging upside down like a demented bat on the climbing frame with my kids!

He was a very successful businessman, too, but ultimately I remember him as a good bloke – he was my best friend.

What were you like as a child?

I was revolting! Always in trouble, and very loud. Most of my reports said I was disruptive.

I used to mimic the masters and do silly things behind their back. I was always the class cheerleader.

Funnily enough, my dad was 
as well. You can read his school reports and mine and they’re almost exactly the same.

How do you spend your free time?

I’ve got a big house in the middle of nowhere, so I enjoy mooching around the countryside.

I live about five minutes away from 
a river and spend a lot of time fishing. I’m also a big cricket fan.

Dad’s War (£7.99, Virgin Books) is out now.