Circular knitting makes use of a special type of knitting needle, the circular knitting needle.

These may look tricky to use but they’re very simple to work with, once you know how. Our experts have put together an easy how-to guide of circular knitting for beginners for you to learn the basics. Read on to find out more.

circular knitting needles | Woman's Weekly | Knitting Circular knitting needles (above) are two needles, slightly shorter than regular straight knitting needles, with each pair joined together with a cable. The length of the cable required depends on the number of stitches you’re working with. When knitting a pattern where the number of stitches dramatically increases or decreases across the project, you will need to change to needles with a shorter or longer length cable, as required.

How To Knit: Five steps to knitting in the round

1. Always use a circular needle with a length that is slightly shorter than the width of your knitting so that the stitches can flow smoothly around the needles as you work. Hold the two tips in the same way you tend to hold your straight knitting needles and allow the cable to hang.

2. Cast on using the method you would usually use and let the stitches slide down the left-hand needle and on to the cable as you work.

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3. When you’ve finished casting on, the stitches should extend around the full length of the cable and up to the right-hand needle tip.

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4. To join up your stitches and begin working in the round, turn your work over so that your yarn is on the right-hand side and make very sure that your cast-on stitches have not twisted around the cable. The first stitch you work into should be the very first stitch that you cast on.

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5. There is no need to turn your work over at the start of a new row when you work in rounds. You will always have the right-side of your work facing you.

Top Tip: As you continue to knit round and round, it can be difficult to see where a new round will begin. Try marking this point in your row with a marker made from contrast-coloured yarn, just like we have, above.