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This Woman’s Weekly Classics Series special has been reprinted by popular demand!

Woman's Weekly 100 Favourite Recipes cover

Woman’s Weekly celebrated its centenary in 2011 and, to mark the occasion, we published our favourite recipes from the magazine’s history, split into four seasonal sections. Afterwards, we thought it’d be a great idea to bring them all together in a special 100-recipe collector’s edition. However, since then we’ve received so many requests from people who missed it that we are reprinting it today.

Throughout the century, our cookery editors have given readers tried, tested and trusted recipes to suit all occasions. Looking back at our cookery features, the food we presented reflects the times well. Introducing new ideas and ensuring that food was well prepared when entertaining was very important, especially for the young housewife in the early years.

oman’s Weekly suggested money-saving menus during the austerity of the First World War, as few eggs and little meat were available. In the 1920s and 1930s, more frivolity crept into the pages, with some serious cake-baking at times.

Another war and rationing meant vegetables, Spam and corned beef reigned supreme at the dining table during the 1940s. Even in the 1950s, some ingredients were still scarce and seasonal produce was predominant. Major changes came in the 1960s, when different food and cooking methods were introduced as people started going abroad on holiday. Indian and Chinese takeaways began to pop up on every high street.

Convenience was the buzzword in the 1970s – frozen food was a growing trend and we were eating less vegetables and more red meat. By the end of the 1980s, many more women worked full time and the style of meals changed again, helped by the introduction of the microwave, which could cook a dinner in minutes. Healthy eating was on the agenda – but then, so was the hamburger!

From the 1990s, supermarkets took charge of food preparation, TV chefs’ egos were getting bigger and cooking began to become a leisure pastime.

Now, growing your own fruit and veg, cooking at home and baking, in particular, are continuing to grow in popularity. So whether you need to cook quick meals or want to slow it right down, we hope you’ll find just the right recipe here!

Can’t get your hands on a copy?

You can buy single back copies if you’ve missed an issue of our Woman’s Weekly Classics Series.